All the work that I have done—this is a very strange business, and a very strange endeavor of life—all the work that I have done in my life will be obsolete by the time I am fifty. Apple II is obsolete now, Apple I’s were obsolete many years ago. Macintosh is on the verge of becoming obsolete in the next few years.

This is a field where one does not write a Principia which holds up for two hundred years. This is not a field where one paints a painting that will be looked at for centuries, or builds a church that will be admired and looked at in astonishment for centuries.

No, this is a field where one does one’s work and in ten years its obsolete, and really will not be usable in ten or twenty years. I mean, you can’t go back and use and Apple I, cuz there’s no software for it. In another ten years or so you won’t be able to use an Apple II. You won’t even be able to fire it up and see what it was like.

So its sort of like sediment of rocks. You’re building up a mountain, and you get to contribute your little layer of sedimentary rock to make the mountain that much higher. But no one on the surface will, unless they have x-ray vision, will see your sediment. They’ll stand on it, it’ll be appreciated by that rare geologist, but no, its not like the renaissance at all. Its very different.

When you grow up you tend to get told the world is the way it is and you’re life is just to live your life inside the world. Try not to bash into the walls too much. Try to have a nice family, have fun, save a little money.

That’s a very limited life. Life can be much broader once you discover one simple fact: Everything around you that you call life was made up by people that were no smarter than you and you can change it, you can influence it, you can build your own things that other people can use.

Once you learn that, you’ll never be the same again.

— Steve Jobs
Interview with Santa Clara Valley Historical Association, 1994

(Source: youtube.com)

When you want to understand something that’s never been understood before, what you have to do is construct conceptual scaffolding. And if you’re trying to design a computer you will literally immerse yourself in the thousands of details necessary; all of a sudden, as the scaffolding gets set up high enough, it will all become clearer and clearer and that’s when the breakthrough starts. It is a rhythmic experience, or it is an experience where everything’s related to everything else and it’s all intertwined. And it’s such a fragile, delicate experience that it’s very much like music. But you could never describe it to anyone.
Reblogged from turner.io
Tags: steve jobs
You can’t connect the dots looking forward; you can only connect them looking backwards. So you have to trust that the dots will somehow connect in your future.
— Steve Jobs (via sahil)
Reblogged from Sahil
Like Walt Disney, Steve (Jobs) had an expectation of excellence. He has obsessively high standards and he never accepted the merely good; he only accepted insanely great. He believed success came from collaboration, and great things in business were never done by one person. He thought deeply about everything and never rushed important matters. He would urge me to focus on what counts. He believed what mattered most was “great ideas and great people”
— Robert A. Iger
President and CEO of The Walt Disney Company
Taken from the 2011 Annual Report of The Walt Disney Company
(via pomegranatechapstick)
Reblogged from at la-la land
Steve Jobs showed some friends the qualities of the new iMac computer unveiled at MacWorld. After his keynote address, Apple co-founder and CEO Steve Jobs mingled with the people looking at the newest offerings from Apple.

Steve Jobs showed some friends the qualities of the new iMac computer unveiled at MacWorld. After his keynote address, Apple co-founder and CEO Steve Jobs mingled with the people looking at the newest offerings from Apple.

Steve Jobs speaks at a NeXT product release at their headquarters in Palo Alto, Calif. on Oct. 5, 1988.

Steve Jobs speaks at a NeXT product release at their headquarters in Palo Alto, Calif. on Oct. 5, 1988.